Editorial: About the possibility of Applied Vegetation Science going Gold Open Access

Prepared by David Zelený (Editor of the Vegetation Science Blog and Associate Editor in JVS)

Some time ago, IAVS was put in front of quite an important decision. Two of our journals, the Journal of Vegetation Science and Applied Vegetation Science, are currently distributed under the hybrid open-access model, when readers pay, and authors publish for free (while allowing publishing also open access articles for an extra cost).…

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Sampling multi-scale and multi-taxon plant diversity data in the subalpine and alpine habitats of Switzerland: Report on the 14th EDGG Field Workshop

By Jürgen Dengler, Beata Cykowska-Marzencka, Timon Bruderer, Christian Dolnik, Patrick Neumann, Susanne Riedel, Hallie Seiler, Jinghui Zhang & Iwona Dembicz

Sampling an acidic subalpine grassland at Alp Glivers, canton of Grisons, Switzerland, with the nested-plot methodology of EDGG. Photo credit: Jürgen Dengler.
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JVS 2020/6 contains Special Feature “Dispersal and Establishment”

The new issue of JVS contains 16 articles of the Special Feature “Plant dispersal and establishment as drivers of vegetation dynamics and resilience”, edited by Péter Török, James M. Bullock, Borja Jiménez-Alfaro and Judit Sonkoly.

The title picture by Anton Korablev shows the establishment of pioneer plants on a volcanic plateau in Kamchatka, Russia.
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Palaearctic Grasslands 47 is published

Prepared by Jürgen Dengler (Deputy Chief Editor of Palaearctic Grasslands)

The new issue of Palaearctic Grasslands, EDGG’s scientific journal and magazine is out, and you can read the complete issue here. On 75 richly illustrated pages, it contains reports and announcements from EDGG activities, a long Scientific Report on the 14th EDGG Field Workshop, three Photo Stories, two Glimpses of a Grassland, Short Contributions and a Book Review.…

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How does the Kalahari vegetation response to seasonal climate and herbivory?

The post provided by Ute Schmiedel

One of our permanent plots in the Kalahari, South Africa, at the peak of the growing season during an average rainfall season (2013) and after several years of very low rainfall (2015). The grazing herbivores removed most of the grass biomass and provided vegetation gaps for the new plants to grow.
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Endozoochory of the same community of plants lacking fleshy fruits by storks and gulls

By Víctor Martín-Vélez, Ádám Lovas-Kiss, Marta I. Sánchez and Andy J. Green

Sampling bird faeces and regurgitates from a dyke alongside recently harvested ricefields in Doñana, south-west Spain. Photo credit: Andy J. Green.

We teach our children that seeds disperse in different manners according to their morphology, and how only those inside berries and other fleshy fruits are able to disperse inside birds, a process known as “endozoochory”.…

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Environmental variables driving species composition in Subarctic springs in the face of climate change

Prepared by Tara K. Miller, Einar Heegaard, Kristian Hassel & Jutta Kapfer

A spring in Kvannfjellet in Balsfjord county, Norway. Photo credit: Jutta Kapfer.

Springs are important ecosystems to support biodiversity. They are fed by groundwater and are critical for maintaining high biodiversity because of the specific and stable habitat conditions they provide: high water quality, consistent temperatures, and low seasonal variability.…

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The ecological filters in restoration practice

The post provided by Paweł Waryszak

Paweł Waryszak, the main author of this study, records seedlings emergence on restoration study site after topsoil transfer. Photo credit: William Fowler.

This post refers to the article Best served deep: the seedbank from salvaged topsoil underscores the role of the dispersal filter in restoration practice by Waryszak et al.…

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